Humboldt receives small award of Moneypox vaccines

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The federal government has assigned 20 monkeypox vaccines to Humboldt County following the recent rapid spread of the rare zoonotic infection, including more than 350 known cases in California, although none have been confirmed locally, according to the county’s Department of Health and Human Services.

“With no confirmed cases currently in Humboldt County, our small vaccine allocation will be used in the event of a local outbreak,” DHHS Director Sofia said. Pereira said in a statement, noting that the California Department of Public Health and other local health departments state jurisdictions are asking the Centers for Disease Control for more.

According to the CDC, vaccinating someone who has been directly exposed to someone with monkeypox, which is caused by a virus in the same family as smallpox, within four days can reduce the onset and spread of the disease.

Monkeypox is endemic to many countries in Central and West Africa, however, recent cases of monkeypox have been reported in non-endemic countries including the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, as well as in other parts of Europe and Australia,” the DHHS statement read. “The monkeypox virus is transmitted to humans from humans, animals, and infected materials contaminated with the virus.”

DHHS has offered the following advice:

  • Practice good hand hygiene
  • Always tell your intimate partner about any recent illnesses and be aware of any new or unexplained sores or rashes on your or your partner’s body, including on the mouth, genitals and anus
  • Avoid intimate contact, including sex, with people with symptoms such as sores or rashes
  • Avoid contact with infected animals and materials contaminated with the virus Infected people should self-isolate until their symptoms, including rashes, have completely resolved
  • Use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) such as a mask, gown, and gloves when caring for people with symptoms.

Read the full statement from DHHS below:

There are currently more than 350 cases of monkeypox in California, but local officials say there are still no confirmed cases in Humboldt County.


With recent outbreaks in the United States, the federal government has allocated specific amounts of hard-to-obtain vaccines to states across the country. California counties such as San Francisco and Santa Clara received allocations large enough to hold mass vaccination clinics.

Humboldt County’s current allocation is 20 vaccines.

Additionally, a small number of vaccines have been sent to Humboldt County Public Health for lab personnel who will be testing monkeypox samples in the lab.

Sofia Pereira, director of public health for the Department of Health and Human Services, said, “With no confirmed cases currently in Humboldt County, our small vaccine allocation will be used in the event of a local outbreak.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), vaccinating people who have had direct contact with someone with a confirmed case of monkeypox within four days of exposure can help prevent onset and spread. spread of the disease.

She said local state health jurisdictions and the California Department of Public Health are currently asking the CDC for more vaccines.

Monkeypox is a rare zoonotic infection caused by the monkeypox virus, which belongs to the same family as smallpox, but is less serious than smallpox. Monkeypox is endemic to many countries in Central and West Africa, however, recent cases of monkeypox have been reported in non-endemic countries including the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, as well as in other parts of Europe and Australia. The monkeypox virus is transmitted to humans from infected humans, animals and materials contaminated with the virus.

Although the risk to the general US population is low, the following tips can help you stay safe:

  • Practice good hand hygiene
  • Always tell your intimate partner about any recent illnesses and be aware of any new or unexplained sores or rashes on your or your partner’s body, including on the mouth, genitals and anus
  • Avoid intimate contact, including sex, with people with symptoms such as sores or rashes
  • Avoid contact with infected animals and materials contaminated with the virus Infected people should self-isolate until their symptoms, including rashes, have completely resolved
  • Use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) such as a mask, gown, and gloves when caring for people with symptoms.

To learn more about prevention measures, visit the CDC at https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/prevention.html.


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